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343 Ortigas Avenue
Mandaluyong City, NCR
Philippines

+63 (2) 721 2000

De La Salle Philippines is a network of Lasallians in the Sector of the Philippines established to facilitate collaboration in the Lasallian Mission and the promotion of the spirit of faith, zeal for service and communion in mission that together, are at the heart of the journey of our Founder, John Baptist de La Salle.

De La Salle Philippines is committed to building up educational communities that demonstrate commitment to young people, especially those who are poor, by providing them with access to a human and Christian education that enables them to participate in the transformation of society.

Lasallian Stories

In November of 1691, De La Salle found himself and his group of teachers in a dire situation. At that time, he and the Brothers had established several schools that provided a Christian education to all children without regard to social class or income.

The Heroic Vow

Marc Gepaya

The Heroic Vow

"In November of 1691, De La Salle found himself and his group of teachers in a dire situation. At that time, he and the Brothers had established several schools that provided a Christian education to all children without regard to social class or income. But their ministry was now at risk as opposition to De La Salle’s work grew and his fragile congregation experienced harassment and lawsuits. We might expect that this overwhelming adversity would be enough for our founder and the Brothers to quit or give up the schools. However, it was in this new crossroads that in 1691, a strong sense of association emerged among three friends—De La Salle, Br. Nicholas Vuyart and Br. Grabriel Drolin. They vowed to keep together for the sake of the mission even if all others left and they were obliged to beg for alms and live on bread alone. Together, they would discern on what was best for the society of the Christians schools and what God required of them. It came to be known as the Heroic Vow—a statement that radically committed these founding teachers to the work they were called to do. This vow of association and union pronounced on November 21st, 1691 was an act of hope at the time when the work of De La Salle and the early Brothers was in serious jeopardy."